Market Reseach

August 22, 2007 (Rotterdam)

Better conditions in the Netherlands than in France for women suffering from incontinence

A survey conducted among incontinent women in France, the Netherlands and Poland shows that there are big differences among the countries when it comes to access to physicians and nurses who are trained to address problems with bladder and bowel control. In the Netherlands, 65 percent of the women agree that they have easy access, compared with just 20 percent in France. The comparable figure for Poland is 25 percent.

The survey was performed on behalf of WFIP, World Federation of Incontinent Patients, and the countries were chosen because they represent different regions with different healthcare systems for reimbursement of continence care. In the Netherlands the reimbursement system is fully developed, in Poland only partly and in France reimbursement is very limited. The survey was carried out by the British-owned global research institute TNS using panels of representative consumers in each country.

According to the survey, there is a far greater choice of treatment in the Netherlands, where 68 percent of the women consider that they can choose the treatment they would like to have. Only half of the Polish women and just 35% of the French women consider themselves to have the same freedom.

Another question asked of the respondents was whether everybody in their country, regardless of education, social status, income, living area etc., is treated fairly and equally by the healthcare delivery system with respect to bladder and bowel conditions. In the Netherlands, 60 percent of the women agree such equity exists. The corresponding share of women in France is 26 percent and in Poland just 19 percent of the women agree.

“The study shows that there are big differences, and this is most likely a consequence of the different reimbursement policies in the countries,” states Lynne Van Poelgeest, vice president of WFIP. “But even if the situation in the Netherlands is better than in France or Poland, it is far from satisfactory when, for example, 40 percent of the Dutch women do not feel that there is equity in the system. Even here, we still have disparities and gaps to address.”

The World Federation of Incontinent Patients was established in 2005 and is a global non-profit association for patients with incontinence and related pelvic floor disorders and their respective national associations.

For further information, please contact Lynne Van Poelgeest, vice president of the WFIP. Phone +31 645 488 321. E-mail 12move@wfip.org.

Backgrounder

Survey

Excerpt from results from omnibus surveys in the Netherlands, France and PolandTarget: Incontinent women, 40+ yearsPerformed in July 2007 by the British research institute TNS Global. Internet omnibus survey including a representative selection of women 40+ years

Thinking about bladder weakness and different treatments, how much do you agree or disagree with each of the following statements?

Agree strongly: 5, Agree slightly: 4, Neither agree nor disagree: 3, Disagree slightly: 2, Disagree strongly: 1

Base

NL: 80

France: 97

Poland: 81

I have easy access to physicians and nurses who are trained to address problems with bladder and bowel control.

NL: 3.7 (65%)

France: 2.4 (20%)

Poland: 2.4 (25%)

I think that everybody in my country (regardless of education, social status, income, living area, etc.) is treated fairly and equally by the healthcare delivery system in respect of bladder and bowel control conditions.

NL: 3.7 (60%)

France: 2.6 (26%)

Poland: 2.3 (19%)

I have the possibility to choose the type of treatment I’d like to have for my bladder weakness condition.

NL: 3.8 (68%)

France: 3.1 (35%)

Poland: 3.4 (50%)

The World Federation of Incontinent Patients (WFIP)

The World Federation of Incontinent Patients (WFIP) was established in 2005 to advocate on behalf of the estimated 50-100 million adults worldwide with urinary and/or faecal incontinence and related pelvic floor disorders. At least 36 million are European citizens1, while about 25 million are Americans. A disproportionate number are female and elderly. Already there are 47 consumer organizations in 33 countries undertaking a mission of education and advocacy at the national level. The Federation serves as an umbrella, global entity for all of them, as well as for residents of those countries without any such representative.

References:
1. Federazione Italiana INCOntinenti,www.finco.org